somewhereto_ FRAMED exhibition pt.2

By May 18, 2015

Art & Photography.

 


FRAMED was an exhibition of young people’s artwork in windows of shops and cafe’s around Wakefield which took place from the 1st – 28th April and was facilitated by regional freelancers Amy Lilley and Lucy Norton for somewhereto_


To give you a bit of context, somewhereto_  is a national project, funded by the Big Lottery, which seeks to find free space and opportunities for young people aged 16 – 25.
This could be somewhere to rehearse and/or perform, an empty shop unit for them take over, office space, exciting locations for film and photography, event space, exhibition space, artist studio space, somewhere to set up a film festival or a music gig, literally anything that we can help facilitate.


somewhereto_ runs nationwide via our regional freelancers who organise various events and support young people to carry out their creative projects.

 

FRAMEDposter2
somewhereto_FRAMED – Wakefield


 

This past month TSOTA have had the pleasure of showcasing work from some of the young artists involved in the FRAMED exhibition in Wakefield as well as interviewing those involved in the project. Here are 4 more of the talented young artists involved in FRAMED…

 

Jack Barber
Jack Barber
Fine Artist
jackbarberart.com

 

Jade Clark
Jade Clark
Photographer

 

Ruth Bader

Ruth Bader 2

Ruth Bader
Fine Artist
https://ruthisvisual.wordpress.com

 

Sarah Scruton
Sarah Scruton
Fine Artist
www.intricate.org.uk

 


An Interview with Amy Lilley and Lucy Norton of somewhereto_. :

 

TSOTA: How did you become involved in FRAMED?
A&L: We became Freelancers for somewhereto_ at the start of March and other freelancers around the country had organised to run FRAMED in their cities. It was a great first somewhereto_ project for us as we already do similar things in Wakefield, such as putting regular exhibitions up in a real ale pub and organising events and exhibitions as part of the Wakefield Artwalk. We had also done something similar ourselves last year, creating a small window exhibition in an empty shop, and really liked the idea of brightening up streets with artwork and giving the public a chance to see work whilst out shopping and wandering around town. It seemed a really good chance to connect with the other freelancers and be apart of a UK wide project that brought young artists and independent businesses together.

 

TSOTA: How were the young artists selected for the forthcoming exhibition in Wakefield?
A&L: We did an open call initially for FRAMED, advertising it through various social media channels and on Wakefield Arts Hub. We had a really good response through that and from approaching students at local colleges such as Wakefield College and Pontefract NEW college. The idea of FRAMED is that it isn’t judged, so all of the young people that applied had the opportunity to show their work, which I think makes it unique and a really good chance for young people to get their work out there.

 

TSOTA: Which other cities have participated in the public exhibitions?
A&L: Other somewhereto_ Freelancers have run the FRAMED project in London, Brighton, Bristol, Leicester, Newcastle and Londonderry. FRAMED was started last year by Ashleigh Ward, a somewhereto_ freelancer based in Brighton. Over the next couple of years it will be really great to see which other cities in the UK take on the FRAMED project and how it grows.

 

TSOTA: What do you want passers by to take away from the FRAMED exhibition?
A&L: Whenever we put on public exhibitions we always hope that visitors or passers by see something they didn’t expect, that opens their minds and that they will remember and appreciate. By putting artwork on the streets your reaching a hugely varied audience compared to showing work in a traditional gallery. Many of the passers by seeing FRAMED may not consciously appreciate art or make the effort to visit exhibitions so if they stop and look and enjoy what they see then we’re happy.

 

Jack Barber
[Image: Jack Barber]

 

TSOTA: Which are your favourite works included in the exhibition?
A&L: It’s hard to say as we like so many of the pieces the young people have made! Some pieces suit their venue perfectly, such as Bethany Stead’s fine art paintings look really striking in the top windows of vintage shop Eyewood on Wood Street, and Klaudia Ostynowicz’s light bulb installation in Unity Works’ Café/Bar looks so good they’re commissioning her to create a permanent piece for them. We also really like Jack Barber’s contemporary art installation he has created in an empty shop unit in busy shopping centre Trinity Walk and the Wakefield College photography student’s work all exhibited together as its so varied. We were actually really impressed by the quality of work submitted for FRAMED, when you do an open call like we did and accept everything submitted its a really nice surprise when you genuinely like every piece.

 

TSOTA: FRAMED is part of a wider programme somewhereto_. For those who haven’t heard about this can you tell us about the idea behind the project?
A&L: somewhereto_ is a national project, funded by the Big Lottery, which seeks to find free space and opportunities for young people aged 16 – 25. This could be somewhere to rehearse and/or perform, an empty shop unit for them take over, office space, exciting locations for film and photography, event space, exhibition space, artist studio space, somewhere to set up a film festival or a music gig, literally anything that we can help facilitate. somewhereto_ runs nationwide via our regional freelancers who organise various events and support young people to carry out their creative projects.
We’re really interested in hearing from young people in the West Yorkshire area, in particular Wakefield that wants us to help them find a space for their creative idea. They can get in touch with us by emailing us at amyandlucy@somewhereto.org

 

TSOTA: Are somewhereto_ holding any other Yorkshire based events that young artists can get involved in?
A&L: We’re going to be launching FRAMED again in Wakefield on 29th of July which any young artist from Yorkshire can submit work for. We’re also going to be hosting a somewhereto_Screen event soon in Wakefield where we’ll be finding a space to showcase young peoples films. We’re involved in the Wakefield Artwalk as well which is a bi-monthly event where venues and artists come together to put on a variety of exhibitions. We’re keen to get more young artists involved and show work, in particular for the summer Artwalk on 29th July.
If you’re 16-25 and an artist that would like to be involved with any of our projects or would like our help with finding space than just email us at amyandlucy@somewhereto.org

 


 

A Review of FRAMED by Will Law

Having the FRAMED exhibition in Wakefield adds a vibrancy to the city which has always been there, but never so easy to notice. Scattering the art works of young talent in the windows of local businesses is a way to make people pay attention.

FRAMED has woven pieces of photography, illustration, print work and installation seamlessly across the city, spreading the talent of Wakefield and recognition of this into all corners. And, all of the pieces look so at home in the windows. It’s now hard to imagine Eyewood, for instance, without the striking works of Bethany Stead donning the upper windows, or Unity Works’ Café Bar without the stunning light bulb installation by Klaudia Ostynowiaz of Pontefract New College.

 

Bethany Stead
[Image: Bethany Stead]

 

From Cobblers to Create Café to Artpad to Trinity and more, you’ll find the works of emerging local artists. The beauty of this is that the businesses are in different strands of the city centre and are unlikely to be encountered on one route, meaning that whichever area you’re in at the time you’re likely to be confronted by a unique work of art.

But, at the same time, FRAMED is a project all about unity. Firstly, it can be accessed as one exhibition- a mini artwalk in itself. Secondly, it unites those unaware of the young art scene in Wakefield with it. And thirdly, and most excitingly, it unites businesses and artists, showing that the former are dedicated to supporting home-grown talent and giving the latter a platform to exhibit and gain recognition.

It’ll be exciting to see FRAMED making marks across more of the city in the future, expanding Wakefield’s creative community each time a new piece is hung.

 


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